He Left a Fortune, to No One

Roman Blum, shirtless, at a birthday party on Long Island in 1983. In 1949, he and his wife, Eva, moved to Forest Hills, Queens, where they joined a tightknit community of Holocaust survivors.CreditCreditCollection of Charles Goldgrub

Roman Blum, shirtless, at a birthday party on Long Island in 1983. In 1949, he and his wife, Eva, moved to Forest Hills, Queens, where they joined a tightknit community of Holocaust survivors.CreditCreditCollection of Charles Goldgrub

(The New York Times) When Roman Blum died last year at age 97, his body lingered in the Staten Island University Hospital morgue for four days, until a rabbi at the hospital was able to track down his lawyer.

Mr. Blum, a Holocaust survivor and real estate developer, left behind no heirs and no surviving family members — his former wife died in 1992 and the couple was childless. His funeral, held graveside at the New Montefiore Jewish Cemetery in West Babylon, N.Y., was attended by a small number of mourners, most of them elderly fellow survivors or children of survivors.